The first Boston Medical Library (BML) was founded by Doctors John C. Warren and James Jackson in 1805. The Boston Medical Library was formally organized in 1875 by Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes who served as its President. In 1960, the Boston Medical Library and the Harvard Medical School Library entered into an agreement to combine their collections and administration in a new building known as The Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine.     
  The first Boston Medical Library (BML) was founded by Doctors John C. Warren and James Jackson in 1805. The Boston Medical Library was formally organized in 1875 by Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes who served as its President. In 1960, the Boston Medical Library and the Harvard Medical School Library entered into an agreement to combine their collections and administration in a new building known as The Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine. Each of the two original institutions continue collecting and ownership of its holdings. The combined library ranks as one of the largest medical libraries in the world.

The Boston Medical Library is a physicians non-profit organization incorporated in 1877. The BML mission, revised in 2004, is "to be a Library for the dissemination of medical knowledge, the promotion of medical education and scholarship, and the preservation and celebration of medical history, and thereby to advance the quality of health and healthcare of the people." Membership includes 300 fellows. The Boston Medical Library serves as a resource for the medical school faculties and medical students of Harvard Medical School, Boston University Medical School, Tufts University School of Medicine and the University of Massachusetts Medical School. In 1982, the Boston Medical Library formally became the library for the Massachusetts Medical Society.

A Board of Trustees manages the BML. This group meets regularly and has fiduciary responsibility for a significant endowment which provides partial support for the Countway Library as a whole.

The Boston Medical Library is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt, not-for-profit organization.

For further reading see McCord, David (ed.) Bibliotheca Medica: Physician for Tomorrow, Boston: Harvard Medical School, 1966.